Flag of Canada
    Canada Flag
    Canadian flag
    Nickname The Maple Leaf
    l'Unifolié ("the one-leafed")
    Adopted February 15, 1965
    Designer George F.G. Stanley
    Proportion 1:2
    Colors White (Hex #FFFFFF)
    Red (Hex #FF0000)
    Canadian Flag
    The national flag of Canada has two vertical bands of red (hoist and fly side, half width) with white square between them; an 11-pointed red maple leaf is centered in the white square
    Canada Flag - symbolism
    Canada Flag symbolism - meaning
    Red color is a symbol of Canadian sacrifice during World Wars.
    White is the symbol of peace and tranquility reflecting neutrality and impartiality of Canadians
    Long before the arrival of the first European settlers, Canada's Aboriginal peoples had discovered the edible properties of maple sap. In 1860, at a public meeting held in Toronto, the maple leaf was adopted as the national emblem of Canada for use in the decorations for the Prince of Wales' visit. Red and white were designated as Canada's official colours in 1921 by His Majesty, King George V, in the proclamation of the Royal Arms of Canada.
    Canada flag Dimensions
    Canadian Flag history
    Canadian Flag history
    At the time of Confederation, Canada's national flag remained the Union Jack. However, Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's first Prime Minister, flew the Canadian Red Ensign as a distinctive flag of Canada. Following the Second World War, in 1945, an Order in Council authorized the flying of the Canadian Red Ensign from federal government buildings, in Canada and abroad.
    In 1964, Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson made the creation of a new Canadian flag a priority. After eliminating thousands of proposals, the Special Committee on a Canadian Flag was left with three possible designs: one incorporating three red maple leaves with blue bars (nicknamed the "Pearson Pennant"), a flag with a single stylized red maple leaf on a white square with red bars, and another version that contained both the Union Jack and three fleurs-de-lis. On January 28, 1965, the National Flag of Canada was proclaimed by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, to take effect on February 15, 1965. The inspiration for a red and white flag came from Dr. George Stanley, Dean of Arts at the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario. Impressed by the Commandant's flag at the College (a mailed fist holding three maple leaves on a red and white ground), Dr. Stanley suggested to Mr. John Matheson a similar design with a single red maple leaf at the centre. This red - white - red pattern bore a strong sense of Canadian history: the combination had been used as early as 1899 on the General Service Medal issued by Queen Victoria.
    Canadian Flag information
    Canadian Flag facts
    In 1982, Laurie Skreslet, a skier from Calgary, took the Canadian flag to the highest point on Earth, Mount Everest.
    In 1984, the Canadian flag reached new heights when it blasted into space on the flight mission uniform of Marc Garneau, the first Canadian astronaut in space.
    When the Canadian flag flies along with the flags of the 10 provinces and 3 territories, the flags of the provinces and territories follow in the order that they entered Confederation. For those years when multiple provinces entered Confederation, their flags are arranged by size of population at time of entry. The order of precedence is therefore as follows: Ontario (1867), Quebec (1867), Nova Scotia (1867), New Brunswick (1867), Manitoba (1870), British Columbia (1871), Prince Edward Island (1873), Saskatchewan (1905), Alberta (1905), Newfoundland and Labrador (1949), Northwest Territories (1870), Yukon (1898) and Nunavut (1999)
    Canadian National Anthem
    Canada Flag history
    Canadian Red Ensign 1868-1921
    Canadian Red Ensign 1868-1921
    The Canadian Red Ensign is a former flag of Canada, used by the federal government though it was never officially adopted by the Parliament of Canada. It is a British Red Ensign, featuring the Union Flag in the canton, defaced with the shield of the Coat of Arms of Canada.
    Canada Flag history


    Canadian Red Ensign 1921-1957
    Canadian Red Ensign 1921-1957
    A new Canadian Red Ensign was adopted in 1921 that is a red field, featuring the British flag in the canton, defaced with the shield of the Coat of Arms of Canada. The shield contained the three golden lions, the red lion rampant of Scotland, the Irish harp of Tara, the gold fleurs-de-lis of royal France and a sprig of red maple leaves at the bottom.
    Canada Flag history
    Canadian Red Ensign 1957-1965
    Canadian Red Ensign 1957-1965
    A new Canadian Red Ensign was adopted in 1957 that is a red field, featuring the British flag in the canton, defaced with the shield of the Coat of Arms of Canada. The Green Maple leaves from the previous flag were changed to red maple leaves
    Canada Flag Image
    Canada Flag Image
    Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921)
    Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921)
    Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957)
    Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957)
    Canadian Red Ensign (1957-1965)
    Canadian Red Ensign (1957-1965)

    More Facts

    Queen's Personal Canadian Flag
    Royal Standard of Canada
    The Royal Standard of Canada is a heraldic banner adopted and proclaimed by Queen Elizabeth II in 1962 for her use in her capacity as Queen of Canada.
    The flag, in a 1:2 proportion, consists of the escutcheon of the Royal Coat of Arms of Canada in banner form defaced with the distinct device of Queen Elizabeth II used on her Head of the Commonwealth flag: a blue roundel with the initial E surmounted by St Edward's Crown and within a wreath of roses, all gold-coloured.
    Royal Standard of Canada
    Flag of the Governor-General of Canada
    Flag of the Governor-General of Canada
    The current flag of the Governor General of Canada, adopted in 1981, comprises the crest of the royal coat of arms of Canada—a crowned lion holding a red maple leaf in its paw, standing on a wreath of red and white on a blue background.

    Flag of the Governor General of Canada
    Canada flag Protocol
    Canada Flag display rules
    No law dictates the proper use of the Canadian flag.
    However, Canadian Heritage has released guidelines on how to correctly display the flag alone and with other flags. The guidelines deal with the order of precedence in which the Canadian flag is placed, where the flag can be used, how it is used, and what people should do to honour the flag. The suggestions, titled Flag Etiquette in Canada, were published by Canadian Heritage.
    The flag itself can be displayed on any day at buildings operated by the Government of Canada, airports, military bases, and diplomatic offices, as well as by citizens, during any time of the day.
    When flying the flag, it must be flown using its own pole and must not be inferior to other flags, save for, in descending order, the Queen's standard, the governor general's standard, any of the personal standards of members of the Canadian Royal Family, or flags of the lieutenant governors.
    The Canadian flag is flown at half-mast in Canada to indicate a period of mourning.