Canada flag history

    Canada flag

    What is the origin of Canadian flag?

    The first recorded flag to fly on Canadian soil was the Cross of St. George. In 1497, Italian seafarer John Cabot explored and claimed Canada's Atlantic coast in the name of King Henry VII of England. The Cross of St. George was carried by John Cabot when he reached the east coast of Canada in 1497. A watercolour painting by John White depicted English explorers with the Cross of St. George during Martin Frobisher’s expedition of 1577.

    Canadian flag history



    Canada flag
    Canada flag history
    In 1534, French explorer Jacques Cartier explored the Gulf of Saint Lawrence where, on July 24, he planted a 33 ft cross bearing the words "Long Live the King of France" and took possession of the territory 'New France' in the name of King Francis I. The fleur-de-lis was a symbol of French sovereignty in Canada from 1534 to 1763. In 1763, as a result of the French and Indian Wars, France lost its colonial possessions in Canada ceded the territory to the United Kingdom.

    Canada flag history



    Canada flag
    Canada flag
    At the time of Confederation, Canada's national flag remained the Union Jack. However, Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada's first Prime Minister, flew the Canadian Red Ensign as a distinctive flag of Canada. Following the Second World War, in 1945, an Order in Council authorized the flying of the Canadian Red Ensign from federal government buildings, in Canada and abroad.

    Canadian flag history

    Canadian Flag history
    In 1964, Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson made the creation of a new Canadian flag a priority. After eliminating thousands of proposals, the Special Committee on a Canadian Flag was left with three possible designs: one incorporating three red maple leaves with blue bars (nicknamed the "Pearson Pennant"), a flag with a single stylized red maple leaf on a white square with red bars, and another version that contained both the Union Jack and three fleurs-de-lis. On January 28, 1965, the National Flag of Canada was proclaimed by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, to take effect on February 15, 1965. The inspiration for a red and white flag came from Dr. George Stanley, Dean of Arts at the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario. Impressed by the Commandant's flag at the College (a mailed fist holding three maple leaves on a red and white ground), Dr. Stanley suggested to Mr. John Matheson a similar design with a single red maple leaf at the centre. This red - white - red pattern bore a strong sense of Canadian history: the combination had been used as early as 1899 on the General Service Medal issued by Queen Victoria.